Sexual Lives and Respectful Relationships (SL&RR)

Determinants of Health

SL&RR is a model that uses the stories of people with disabilities co-developed with them in narrative research, as the basis of a peer led program with people with an intellectual disability.

Challenge

To address a gap in the literature, research and practice in sexuality and relationships in the lives of people with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Previous work has been medically focused, overlooking questions of identity, rights and peer support.

Solution

To apply the SL&RR model in the lives of people with ABI.

Impact

Recently further adapted by Associate Professor Patsie Frawley, Dr Amie O’Shea and colleagues, the newly developed evidence based program will be used by Brain Injury Association of NSW, which will join the SL&RR network operating across Australia.

Partners

Brain Injury Association of NSW

Sydney Women’s Counselling Centre

SL&RR is a model originally developed by Associate Professor Patsie Frawley and colleagues with lived experience of intellectual disability, based on two decades of work in sexuality and relationships. This model uses the stories of people with disabilities co-developed with them in narrative research, as the basis of a peer led program with people with an intellectual disability.

Research Fellow, Dr Amie O’Shea has recently partnered with the Brain Injury Association of NSW and people with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) to consider how this approach can be used with people with an ABI to address a gap in the literature, research and practice in sexuality and relationships in the lives of people with an ABI. Previously this work has been medically focused, overlooking questions of identity, rights and peer support. People with ABI contributed to the program development as narrative research participants, on the Research Advisory Group, and as newly trained peer educators to deliver the program to their peers with the support of partners at the Brain Injury Association and Sydney Women’s Counselling centre.

“The program is an empowering network of Peer Educators and community partners (Program Partners) who support people with intellectual disability. Together, they change attitudes and approaches to violence, abuse prevention, and sexuality education.”

Associate Professor Patsie Frawley